Anger Thermometer (Lesson and Printable)

Anger Thermometer

Everyone feels angry from time to time, and it can be an overwhelming emotion. Like other emotions, anger comes in different strengths or degrees – you can be just a little annoyed, or you can be boiling mad. In this lesson, students will fill in an anger thermomter with situations that cause them to feel:

  • Furious
  • Angry
  • Upset
  • Annoyed
  • Calm

For each of the top four feelings, they will write ideas for how they can calm down when that situation occurs. After completing the anger thermometer printable and discussing as a group, students will have a much better understanding of the different degrees of angry and how to cope.

Recommended Grade Level: Elementary

SEL Skill(s): Emotion Regulation

Duration: 30 minuntes

Materials:

  • Anger Thermometer worksheet
  • Pencil, Pen, or Computer


Anger Thermometer Lesson Directions

Introduce the activity by saying: “Everyone feels angry sometimes. The other day, I felt angry because [my cat scratched my favorite chair]. When we get angry, it can be helpful to notice that we’re angry. That way we can do something to help us get through the feeling without hurting anyone.”

Hand out the worksheet and say: “You can think of angry feelings like a thermometer – sometimes you’re at a low temperature, feeling a little annoyed, but sometimes you’re all the way up at a really high temperature, feeling furious. For each of the feeling temperatures, or degrees, of anger, think of a time you felt that way or a situation that often makes you feel that way. Then, think of a something you can do when you’re feeling that way that will help you get through the angry feeling and calm down”

Direct students to fill out the worksheet. Note: If you are assigning this worksheet to students working from home, we have made areas of the worksheet typable so they can complete the assignment using a computer.

When your students have completed the worksheet, you can call on a few students to share their ideas and ask for follow-ups from others for additional calming strategies.

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